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{"id":1911856332842,"title":"Hawaiian Fishing Traditions","handle":"hawaiian-fishing-traditions","description":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eHawaiian Fishing Traditions\u003c\/em\u003e celebrates the great fishers of ancient Hawaiʻi known for attracting and propagating fish, inventing fishing techniques, and bringing in extraordinary catches. The most famous of these fishers was Kūʻula-kai, who became deified as an ʻamakua (god) of fishing because of his power to control fish. He built a fish pond in Hāna to keep the aliʻi and the people continuously supplied with seafood. His son ʻAiʻai continued his father's good work by locating offshore fishing grounds called koʻa, teaching people how to catch fish, and telling them to practice conservation and to distribute the catch generously. He established fishing shrines, also call koʻa, and told fishers to offer the first fish to his father and mother as thanks-giving, to insure a good supply and to lift the kapu on the catch and free it for consumption.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMoke Manu \u0026amp; Others\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRevised Edition 2006\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eKalamakū Press\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePages: 153 Softcover\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProduct dimensions: 5 5\/8 x 8 1\/2 inches\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2019-03-13T13:14:08-10:00","created_at":"2019-03-13T13:14:08-10:00","vendor":"Hawaii Pacific Parks Association","type":"Publications","tags":["Book","Crafts","Hawaiiana","Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park","New Arrival","Ocean","Publication"],"price":1295,"price_min":1295,"price_max":1295,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":14646821683242,"title":"Default","option1":"Default","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"1003923","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Hawaiian Fishing Traditions","public_title":null,"options":["Default"],"price":1295,"weight":218,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":4,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1711\/2767\/products\/1003923a.jpg?v=1552522536","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1711\/2767\/products\/1003923b.jpg?v=1552522536"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1711\/2767\/products\/1003923a.jpg?v=1552522536","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cem\u003eHawaiian Fishing Traditions\u003c\/em\u003e celebrates the great fishers of ancient Hawaiʻi known for attracting and propagating fish, inventing fishing techniques, and bringing in extraordinary catches. The most famous of these fishers was Kūʻula-kai, who became deified as an ʻamakua (god) of fishing because of his power to control fish. He built a fish pond in Hāna to keep the aliʻi and the people continuously supplied with seafood. His son ʻAiʻai continued his father's good work by locating offshore fishing grounds called koʻa, teaching people how to catch fish, and telling them to practice conservation and to distribute the catch generously. He established fishing shrines, also call koʻa, and told fishers to offer the first fish to his father and mother as thanks-giving, to insure a good supply and to lift the kapu on the catch and free it for consumption.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMoke Manu \u0026amp; Others\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRevised Edition 2006\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eKalamakū Press\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePages: 153 Softcover\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProduct dimensions: 5 5\/8 x 8 1\/2 inches\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e"}

Hawaiian Fishing Traditions

Product Description

Hawaiian Fishing Traditions celebrates the great fishers of ancient Hawaiʻi known for attracting and propagating fish, inventing fishing techniques, and bringing in extraordinary catches. The most famous of these fishers was Kūʻula-kai, who became deified as an ʻamakua (god) of fishing because of his power to control fish. He built a fish pond in Hāna to keep the aliʻi and the people continuously supplied with seafood. His son ʻAiʻai continued his father's good work by locating offshore fishing grounds called koʻa, teaching people how to catch fish, and telling them to practice conservation and to distribute the catch generously. He established fishing shrines, also call koʻa, and told fishers to offer the first fish to his father and mother as thanks-giving, to insure a good supply and to lift the kapu on the catch and free it for consumption.

Moke Manu & Others

  • Revised Edition 2006
  • Kalamakū Press
  • Pages: 153 Softcover
  • Product dimensions: 5 5/8 x 8 1/2 inches

 

$12.95
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